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Honoring The Beatles’ “Abbey Road,” Released On This Day In 1969

Few albums will ever be as widely appreciated as the great Abbey Road, released by The Beatles on this day in 1969. From its iconic front cover to the sheer genius that exudes from every track, Abbey Road is a truly perfect creation, any way you look at it. For that, we have producer George Martin to thank.

As many know, tension between the members of The Beatles ran high towards the end of the 1960’s. In fact, tension in the whole world peaked around this era, as threats from the Cold War and Vietnam War loomed large. The Beatles were, quite literally, the most popular craze in all of human history, spending the majority of the early 60’s touring the world. It’s no wonder the fame got to their heads, especially as the chaotic world continued to inspire their creativity.

By the end of the 60’s, John Lennon, George Harrison, Paul McCartney and even Ringo Starr were just too famous as artists to work under the direction of one another. Some blame Yoko Ono, though her role in the band’s demise was more symbolic than realistic. Lennon was fascinated by her avant-garde art, and who was going to tell John Lennon not to pursue an artistic direction.

The White Album was really the first sign of the band’s decay, as the release was more a collection of solo albums than it was a cohesive release like Revolver or Sgt. Pepper’s. The band had tried to rally for Let It Be, which was recorded in the early parts of 1969, before Abbey Road, but ultimately released after it in 1970. The Let It Be plans were too extravagant to ever materialize, and instead the band played one last public appearance on the rooftop of Apple Records.

With things in disarray, George Martin and the whole team wanted to give the fans one last true Beatles album. Through his incredible efforts, Abbey Road was created from a collection of music that was all written and recorded individually. The music is incredible, with Lennon’s “Come Together” opening the album and Harrison’s “Something” offering the band’s trademarked sound. A full track-by-track breakdown of Abbey Road is unnecessary at this point. In its now-47 years of existence, I’m guessing you’ve had the chance to listen to Abbey Road.

And in the end, the love you take is equal to the love you make. Here’s to you, Abbey Road.